Tuesday, August 22, 2017

[ELEARN] CFP: IEEE TETC, Special Issue on Scholarly Big Data, Deadline: December 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

IEEE Transactions on Emerging Topics in Computing Special Issue on Scholarly Big Data 

IEEE Transaction on Emerging Topics in Computing (TETC) seeks original manuscripts for a Special Issue/Section on Scholarly Big Data scheduled to appear in the fourth issue of 2018.

Recent years have witnessed the rapid growth of scholarly information due to advancements in information and communication technologies. Scholarly big data is the vast quantity of research output, which can be acquired from digital libraries, such as journal articles, conference proceedings, theses, books, patents, experimental data, etc. It also encompasses various scholarly related data, such as author demography, academic social networks, and academic activity. The abundance of scholarly data sources enables researchers to study the academic society from a big data perspective. The dynamic and diverse nature of scholarly big data requires different data management techniques and advanced data analysis methods. Today’s researchers realize that new scholarly-big-data specific platform/management/techniques/ are needed. Therefore, a set of emerging topics such as scholarly big data acquisition, storage, management and processing are important issues for the research community. Manuscripts submitted to TETC should be computing focused.

This special issue focuses on covering the most recent research results in scholarly big data management and computing. The issue welcomes both theoretical and applied research (e.g. platforms and applications). It will encourage the effort to share data, advocate gold-standard evaluation among shared data, and promote the exploration of new directions. Topics of interest include (but not limited to): 
* New approaches to search and crawling of scholarly big data from various data sources
* Methods for storing, indexing, and query processing for scholarly big data
* Practices for scholarly big data management and sharing
* Heterogeneous scholarly big data source integration, especially for novel datasets (e.g. online social media)
* Scholarly big data analysis, mining, and visualization
* Design of next generation scholarly big data platforms and systems
* Algorithms for measuring the scientific impact of articles, authors, institutions, etc.
* Scientific information network analysis
* Recommendation tools and techniques
* Scientific community detection and clustering
* Graph and text mining in scholarly big data
* Privacy and security issues
* Services and applications

Reference:
Feng Xia, Wei Wang, Teshome Megersa Bekele, Huan Liu. Big Scholarly Data: A Survey, IEEE Transactions on Big Data, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2017, pp: 18 - 35. DOI: 10.1109/TBDATA.2016.2641460

Submitted articles must not have been previously published or currently submitted for journal publication elsewhere. As an author, you are responsible for understanding and adhering to the IEEE submission guidelines. You can access them at the IEEE Computer Society web site, www.computer.org. These should be carefully read before manuscript submission. Please submit your manuscript to Manuscript Central at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tetc-cs

Please note the following important dates.
Submission Deadline: Dec. 1, 2017
Reviews Completed: Mar. 1, 2018
Major Revisions Due (if Needed): April 1, 2018
Reviews of Revisions Completed (if Needed): May 1, 2018
Minor Revisions Due (if Needed): June 1, 2018
Notification of Final Acceptance: August 1, 2018
Publication Materials for Final Manuscripts Due: Sept 1, 2018
Publication date: Last Issue of 2018 (December Issue)

Guest Editors

Feng Xia
Dalian University of Technology, China

Huan Liu
Arizona State University, USA

C. Lee Giles
Pennsylvania State University, USA

Kuansan Wang
Microsoft Research, USA

**** Call For Presentations **** Innovating with Metadata: An Amigos Online Conference

**** Call For Presentations ****
Innovating with Metadata: An Amigos Online Conference

When: Thursday, November 9, 2017, 10:00am- 4:00pm Central Time
Where: Amigos Online Classroom 

Today’s metadata is not yesterday’s cataloging.  Libraries are doing amazing things with all kinds of metadata from many sources.  How is your library innovating with metadata? We would like to hear from you!  Possible topics include:
  • New metadata standards and application profiles
  • Transforming and exchanging metadata within and between organizations
  • Automated ways of generating discovery, preservation and technical metadata
  • New systems; innovative uses of institutional repositories, image management systems, discovery layers 
  • Creative uses of linked data and RDF
  • Transitioning from MARC to BIBFRAME
  • Innovating with metadata on a shoe-string budget

Each session will be 45 minutes in length.  If you're interested in presenting, but have never done it online, don't worry -- we will teach you what you need to know!  We welcome submissions from staff in academic, public and special libraries who work with metadata. 

To submit your presentation idea(s), send us your proposal tohttps://www.amigos.org/node/4657 by August 31st. If you are interested in attending, save the date!  We will be posting registration information in Early October. 


Christine Peterson
Continuing Education Librarian, Technology
Coordinator, AskAcademic Virtual Reference Service
Amigos Library Services

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Help unite the global library field in a vision for the future


The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) is encouraging library staff around the world to share their opinions on a proposed Global Vision for how a connected library field can meet the challenges of the future. 

At workshops held across the globe, key players from the library field have prioritized actions that libraries may take in response to societal changes. Six questions – each with ten possible choices – were selected from the outcomes of these workshops. 

From 21 August until 30 September, library staff can cast their vote on these core questions to help IFLA produce a global library roadmap for the future. Visit this link during the voting period and share your input.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Last Call for Contributions to Column in the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship


This is a last call for contributions to the "E-Resource Round Up" column for volume 29, issue 4 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). 

Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, August 25, 2017. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

Bob Wolverton
Mississippi State University Libraries

Karen Davidson
Mississippi State University Libraries
(662) 325-3018             

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Professionals from Developing Countries can apply for the ALCTS Online Course Grant until August 24

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association, is now accepting applications for the Online Course Grant for Library Professionals from Developing Countries to participate in our online Fundamentals courses held between September 18, 2017 and December 22, 2017. One free seat per session is available to librarians and information professionals from developing countries.

For full information about the grant, including eligibility criteria and a link to the application form, please see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/awards/grants/onlinegrant. Applications may be submitted between July 31, 2017 and August 24, 2017.

Fundamentals of Acquisitions (FOA)
Session 4: September 18 – October 27, 2017
Session 5:  November 6-December 15, 2017

The Fundamentals of Acquisitions (FOA) web course focuses on the basics of acquiring monographs and serials:  goals and methods, financial management of library collections budgets, and relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers, subscription agents, and publishers.  In this course, you will receive a broad overview of the operations involved in acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.  Note that in FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders, receives, and pays for those materials.

Fundamentals of Cataloging (FOC)
Session 4:  September 18 – October 27, 2017
Session 5:  November 6 – December 15, 2017

Fundamentals of Cataloging (FOC) web course begins with a discussion of how cataloging assists users in finding resources and of the value of standardization of practice. These foundations are then given practical grounding in the work of creating bibliographic descriptions, the process of subject analysis, and summarizing content utilizing classification. Standards such as MARC bibliographic and authority formats, Library of Congress Subject Headings and Library of Congress Classification are discussed. The shift in focus from format-based cataloging to entity-relationship model cataloging is taken from the FRBR foundation to the RDA practical application, with a final look at RDF triples and BIBFRAME. In all areas, the value of standards is illustrated and discussed. There is a heavy reliance on examples from actual practice throughout the course content.

Fundamentals of Collection Assessment (FCA)
Session 4:  October 2-November 10, 2017

This online course introduces the fundamental aspects of collection assessment in libraries. The course is designed for those who are responsible for or interested in collection assessment in all types and sizes of libraries. The course will introduce key concepts in collection assessment including the definition of collection assessment, techniques and tools, assessment of print and electronic collections, and project design and management.

Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management (FCDM)
Session 4: September 25 – October 20, 2017
Session 5: November 27 – December 22, 2017

The Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management web course addresses the basic components of these important areas of responsibility in libraries. Components include complete definition of collection development and collection management; collections policies and budgets as part of library planning; collection development (selecting for and building collections); collection management (e.g., making decisions after materials are selected, including decisions about withdrawal, transfer, preservation); collection analysis—why and how to do it; outreach, liaison, and marketing; trends and suggestions about the future for collection development and management.

Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions (FERA)
Session 4: September 25 – October 20, 2017
Session 5: November 27 – December 22, 2017

The Fundamentals of Electronic Resources Acquisitions (FERA) web course will provide an overview of acquiring, providing access to, administering, supporting, and monitoring access to electronic resources.  It will provide a basic background in electronic resource acquisitions including product trials, licensing, purchasing methods, and pricing models and will provide an overview of the sometimes complex relationships between vendors, publishers, platform providers, and libraries.

Fundamentals of Preservation (FOP)
Session 4:  October 2 – November 10, 2017

The Fundamentals of Preservation web course introduces participants to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives.  The course is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. It provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.  Components include preservation as a formal library function and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission; the primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning and careful handling of collections; the history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts preservation options; standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options; and challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship.

Shared on behalf of the ALCTS International Relations Committee,  American Library Association
http://www.ala.org/alcts/awards/grants/onlinegrant

Friday, July 21, 2017

2017 Development and Access to Information Report launched


The DA2I Report shows how essential access to information is for development, and makes the case for coordinated and sustained efforts by all to guarantee it. It demonstrates how meaningful access to information, supported by libraries, contributes to the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, and monitors the progress countries are making towards fulfilling their commitments under the UN 2030 Agenda.

As the Agenda for Sustainable Development progresses, the need to address the underlying factors holding back development in all our societies becomes more and more pressing. Few are as pernicious as information poverty – the lack of access to, or the ability to use, the information necessary to foster economically and socially inclusive societies. IFLA President Donna Scheeder stressed: “There is no sustainable development without access to information. And there is no meaningful, inclusive access to information without libraries.

In addition to the regulatory changes and infrastructure investment needed to ensure that everyone has the practical possibility to get online, the report calls for a coordinated drive to ensure that people have the confidence and skills needed to get the best out of the Internet. This will require contributions from all levels of government and across stakeholder groups.

To monitor Member States’ progress, the report presents a set of baseline indicators, drawing on established datasets, as well as providing contributions from international experts showing how access to information is already making a difference. The report focuses this year on four SDGs highlighted at this year’s UN HLPF – agriculture (SDG 2), health (SDG 3), gender equality (SDG 5), and infrastructure and innovation (SDG 9). 

Libraries, as pre-existing, trusted public centres, with both a global perspective and strong understanding of local needs, are essential partners for governments in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. IFLA is working globally to ensure libraries’ key contribution to development is recognised. It has signed agreements with representatives from 73 countries, committing to work with them to build understanding of the UN 2030 Agenda at a national and regional level, and engage in the planning, monitoring and implementation processes of National Development Plans. 

IFLA Secretary General Gerald Leitner remarked: “The library field is unique. A global community of millions of institutions, sharing the same values and objectives. IFLA, as the global voice of libraries, is proud to be able to bring this potential to bear in support of development. I believe that, together, we can deliver. The library field is certainly ready.

The report can be downloaded from the DA2I official website at DA2I.ifla.org.

Monday, July 10, 2017

The AfLIA Leadership Academy – Call for Applications


African Library & Information Associations & Institutions (AfLIA) is collaborating with the Public Library Association (PLA) to establish the AfLIA Leadership Academy aimed at:

    AfLIA logo
  • Building the knowledge, skills and confidence of library leaders to act in innovative and creative ways in meeting community needs;
  • Supporting library leaders to foster partnerships between libraries and government agencies, the private sector, NGOs, civil society, and faith-based organizations to work together to improve the lives of community members; and
  • Strengthening library leaders’ skills and assisting them find innovative approaches to library services, tangibly improving the value libraries bring to communities.
AfLIA invites applications from librarians working in public and national libraries to participate in the Leadership Academy, which begins in January 2018 and runs for eight months. The Academy aims to support middle managers in African public and national libraries to be true leaders
in their communities. Anticipated outcomes for participants are to:
  • Understand the nature and requirements of effective leadership and one’s own leadership style;
  • Gain a deep understanding of how to manage change and how to effectively carry out civic engagement;
  • Apply the concept of Asset Based Community Development using the assets within their communities to bring about positive change;
  • Understand the opportunities offered and challenges posed by partnering with both library and non-library organisations; and 
  • Form a network of engaged and transforming library leaders ready to lead in taking their national, African and Global Development agendas forward.
The Leadership Academy includes a five-day workshop in January 2018, followed by eight months of support from Coaches who are recognized leaders in the field. There will be three participants
assigned to each Coach.


Within the eight months, participants will be expected to:
  • Attend three webinars run by their Coaches and attended by the three people in their coaching group between February and May 2018.
  • Develop and implement a project geared at improving the livelihoods of the community.
  • Report on their work at the AfLIA Public Libraries Summit in May 2018.
  • Take a two week study visit to US public libraries (participants will pay for their travel costs including visa and travel insurance and AfLIA will pay for the accommodation and meals).
  • Take part in the evaluation of the Academy after eight months.
  • Continue to network with their colleagues at the Academy for a minimum period of one year.
Applicants must meet the following qualifying criteria:
  • Must be from an African public or national library service.
  • Must have at least three years of experience at managerial level.
  • Must be able to read and write in English (because the course is conducted in English).
  • Must have documented support from his/her organization.
  • Must be an active member of the local library association.
  • The institution to which he/she belongs must be a member of AfLIA.
In addition, it will be advantageous to be from an institution that is hosting/has hosted an INELI participant and have demonstrated leadership qualities.

Interested applicants should download and complete the Application Form at http://dl.aflia.net/AfLIA_leadership_form.docx
Send completed applications and all accompanying documents by email with the subject ‘Application for AfLIA Leadership Academy’ to programofficer@aflia.net with a copy to secretariat@aflia.net by August 18, 2017.

Institutional support should be in the form of an endorsement letter from the applicant's library, on the library’s letterhead and signed by the head of the institution or his/her representative,
scanned and included with the completed form.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Call for Proposals: Advances in Library Administration and Organization


Libraries have begun doing more to support entrepreneurship and innovation within their communities. Makerspaces and business incubators have become featured attractions in public and academic libraries and provide a unique way to reach out to a user group that can bolster a community in dynamic ways. ALAO seeks submissions for the “Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation” volume that delve beyond examples and case studies to look at how library leaders can develop support for innovation and entrepreneurship within their libraries. Examples include but are not limited to: analyzing case studies from several institutions to identify best practices; ways of designing library spaces to ensure they meet the needs of all constituents; theoretical discussions on how activities/spaces supporting entrepreneurship and innovation reflect the mission of libraries; creative ways to get resources to support efforts in these areas; how these areas can lead to new kinds of collaborations that benefit libraries.

Editors are particularly interested in proposals on the following topics:
  • How the historical and cultural role of libraries has changed (or not) to include services that support creativity and innovation.
  • How and why the development of makerspaces and incubators (or other innovative programs) supports the larger community in which the library is situated.
  • How innovative and entrepreneurial support develops new partnerships, and how those partnerships can be sustained.
If you are interested in contributing to this volume, send an abstract of 300 words or less as well as author details and estimated length of final submission to Samantha Hines at shines@pencol.edu.
Proposal deadline: August 31, 2017. Notification of acceptance: October 31, 2017.

This will be the first volume of ALAO to publish in 2019.
Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College
Volume Editor: Janet Crum, Northern Arizona University

Advances in Library Administration and Organization (ALAO) offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library administration and organization. The series answers the questions, “How have libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across issues. Through this series, practitioners can glean new approaches in challenging times and collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional quandaries. ALAO is published by Emerald Publishing
http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/books/series.htm?id=0732-0671